EFG Magazine

After a bipartisan backlash, the agency will transition away from using a service from ID.me.

ldquo;The I.R.S. takes taxpayer privacy and security seriously, and we understand the concerns that have been raised,rdquo; said Charles P. Rettig, the I.R.S. commissioner.
ldquo;The I.R.S. takes taxpayer privacy and security seriously, and we understand the concerns that have been raised,rdquo; said Charles P. Rettig, the I.R.S. commissioner.
“The I.R.S. takes taxpayer privacy and security seriously, and we understand the concerns that have been raised,” said Charles P. Rettig, the I.R.S. commissioner. Credit... Pool photo by Tom Williams

Alan Rappeport Kashmir Hill

Feb. 7, 2022

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WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service plans to stop using facial recognition software to identify taxpayers seeking access to their accounts on the agency’s website amid concerns over privacy and data security.

The I.R.S. was already coping with a daunting tax season, faced with backlogs of old tax returns, staffing shortages and the additional complexity of paying stimulus and child tax credits. Now the agency must also change how it verifies the identity of taxpayers.